Destroying Functions

I have spent the better part of 2 weeks going over various mathematical relationships in my Grade 10 class. They have been represented as tables of values, arrow diagrams, and sets of ordered pairs. Relationships, both qualitative and quantitative, have been defined, analyzed, and graphed. My focus on graphical literacy has been previously detailed on the blog. See the link below for details: http://musingmathematically.blogspot.com/2011/10/graphing-literacy.html Numerous relationships were handled. Students we required to create a family tree and then represent its branches as a table of values and set of ordered pairs. Throughout the various exercises, the words “input”, “output”, “domain”, …

Continue reading »

Graphing Literacy

My school division has been pushing literacy for a few years now. The division priority has filtered its way down into many programs at the school level. As a basic premise, if students are exposed to literate people and perform literate activities, their skills will grow.  As the term is dissected, it seems that every stakeholder can find a way to skew the term to mean that their discipline is a crucial part of being literate. Reading and writing skills are an obvious avenue, but the ideas of technological and social literacy have emerged as important parts of every student’s …

Continue reading »

Proper Workspace for Workplace

My province is in the midst of a major overhaul on its curriculum. This puts me in a very interesting situation. I am a new teacher in a large division filled with veteran teachers that all feel as overwhelmed as myself. I can’t decide if this is a curse or a blessing; I simply continue to roll with all the punches that curriculum renewal brings. On top of the nuts-and-bolts of each new course (5 of which I teach for the first time this year), the division heaps on division, school, department, and personal learning priorities. To make matters even …

Continue reading »

Mathematics for Bros

Before I begin, I would like to make sure that the title of this post was not misleading. If you are reading because you are fuming at the gender inequality reference in the title, please relax. I am in no way advocating that Mathematics is for Bros; the following post is a collection of the mathematical quips garnered from the “New York Times” bestseller, The Bro Code. It is a sacred cannon passed down from generation to generation of Bros designed to guide the lives and decisions of Bros worldwide. The book takes a humourous look at the superstitions of …

Continue reading »